St. Peters in the 1930's

St. Peters in the 1930's
St. Peters in the 1930's

Friday, January 23, 2015

The New Kent Resolves II

 New Kent's response to the crisis of 1774 . . .

At a Meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of New Kent, at the Courthouse of the said County, on Tuesday the 12th of July 1774, Thomas Adams, Esquire, being first chosen Moderator, and William Clayton, Esquire, Clerk, the present State of America being seriously and duly considered, the following Resolutions were proposed and agreed to, as an Instruction to our Deputies hereafter named:
Resolved, that our Sovereign Lord King, George III, is lawful and righful King of Great Britain and all his Dominions in America, to whose Royal Person and Government we protest all due Subjection, Obedience, and Fidelity; and that we will, at all Times, defend and protect the just Rights of his Majesty with our Lives and Fortunes.
Resolved, that the Inhabitants of the British Colonies in America are entitled to all the Rights, Liberties, and Privileges, of free born English Subjects.
Resolved, that the Right to impose Taxes or Duties to be paid by the Inhabitants of this Dominion for any Purpose whatever, is peculiar and essential to the General Assembly, in whom the legislative Authority of the Colony is vested, and that Taxation and Representation are inseparable.
Resolved, that the Trial by Jury of the Vicinage is the Glory of the English Law, and the best Security for the Life, Liberty, and Property of the Subject, and is the undoubted Birthright of all his Majesty's free born American Subjects.
Resolved, that the several Acts and Resolutions of the Parliament of Great Britain made during his present Majesty's Reign, imposing Taxes or Duties on the Inhabitants of America, for the express Purpose of raising a Revenue, and for altering the Nature or Punishment of Offences committed in American, or the Method of Trial of such Offences, are unconstitutional, arbitrary, and unjust, and destructive of the Rights of America, and that we are not bound to yield Obedience to any such Acts.
Resolved, that the late cruel, unjust, and sanguinary Acts of Parliament, to be executed by military Force and Ships of War upon our Sister colony of the Massachusetts Bay, and Town of Boston, is strong Evidence of the corrupt Influence obtained by the British Ministry in Parliament, and a convincing Proof of their fixed Intention to deprive the Colonies of their constitutional Rights, and Liberties.
Resolved, that the Cause of the Town of Boston is the common Cause of all the American Colonies.
Resolved, that it is the Duty and Interest of all American Colonies firmly to unite in an indissoluble Union and Association, to oppose, by every just and proper Means, the infringements of their Rights and Liberties.
Resolved, that we do heartily approve of the Resolutions and Proceedings of our sever late Assemblies for affecting and supporting the just Rights and Liberties of America, from their patriotick Resolves in 1765 this Time.
Resolved, that we will most firmly unite with the other Counties in this Colony, in such Measures as shall be approved of by Majority as the best and most proper Means of preserving our Rights and Liberties, and opposing the said unconstitutional Acts of Parliament.
Resolved, that the most effectual Method of opposing the said several Acts of Parliament will be to break off all commercial Intercourse with Great Britain, until the said Acts shall be repealed.
Resolved, that the several counties within this colony ought to nominate and appoint, for every County, proper Deputies to meet upon the first Day of August next, in the City of Williamsburg, then and there to consult and agree upon the best and most proper Means for carrying into Execution these or any other Resolutions which shall be best calculated to answer the Purposes aforesaid.
Resolved, that it is earnestly recommended to the Deputies at the said general Convention to nominate and appoint fit and proper Persons, on Behalf of this Colony, to meet such Deputies as shall be appointed by the other Colonies in General Congress, to consult and agree upon a firm and indissoluble Union and Association, for preserving, by the best and most proper Means, their common Rights and Liberties.
Resolved, that BURWELL BASSETT and BARTHOLOMEW DANDRIDGE, Esquires, our late and present worthy Representatives, be and they are hereby nominated and appointed Deputies, on the Part and Behalf of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of this County, to meet such Deputies as shall be appointed by the other Counties within this Colony, in the City of Williamsburg, on the first Day of August next, or at any other Time or Place, for the Purpose aforesaid.
Resolved further, that our said Deputies agree to join in any proper Means that shall be adopted for the Immediate Relief of the present Necessities of the Inhabitants of the Town of Boston.
Resolved, that the Clerk transmit the foregoing Resolutions and Instructions to the Printers, to be Published.

                                            WILLIAM CLAYTON, Clerk of the Meeting



- The Virginia Gazette(Williamsburg), July 21, 1774

Thursday, January 22, 2015

The New Kent Resolves I

How to start a revolution . . .

In the spring and summer of 1774 the American colonies were convulsed by the repercussions of the Boston Tea Party. Seen as a mere political prank by many today, the dumping of the tea into Boston harbor by the Sons of Liberty brought down the wrath of the British empire on the Colony of Massachusetts and the town of Boston. The so called "Intolerable Acts" passed by Parliament showed how far the Ministry in London was willing to go in quelling the rapidly rising American dissent.

On May 23, 1774 the House of Burgesses declared that June 1 would be a day of "fasting, humiliation, and prayer" in sympathy and solidarity with the people of Massachusetts. Attempting to nip Virginia's political fervor in the bud, the Earl of Dunmore, royal governor of Virginia, dissolved the General Assembly. Scattering the Burgesses to the winds proved a miscalculation however, as they called for a meeting that would become the first Revolutionary Convention and then organized the political forces of their respective counties. The political leadership in counties across the colony drafted protests expressing their commitment to opposition to Great Britain.


-TO BE CONTINUED

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

A Marriage

Married.
In New Kent county, on the 12th of January, by the Rev. Mr. Turner, Mr. Thomas C. Wilkse, company F. Third Virginia cavalry, to Mollie P., the second daughter of John E. Epps, of Richmond, Virginia.


-The Daily Dispatch- January 21, 1865.


This should be the 25 year old Charles Thomas Wilks, son of Abner Wilks and his wife Mary. Sometimes spelled Wilks, sometimes Wilkes, depending on what record you consult.
Company F, Third Virginia Cavalry was of course the New Kent Cavalry or New Kent Dragoons.

Saturday, January 10, 2015

More New York at Eltham 1862- The Funeral of Friederick Pross

The ceremonies in honor of Lieutenant Pross mentioned as among the dead in my post Monday.

FUNERAL OF LIEUTENANT PROSS, OF THE THIRTY-FIRST REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.--The police and military are making quite extensive preparations for the funeral of Lieutenant Pross, of the Thirty-first regiment (formerly of the Metropolitan Police), killed at the battle of West Point, Virginia. The funeral will start from St. Marcus' church, Sixth street at half past one tomorrow. Superintendent Kennedy has issued the following order:—

SPECIAL ORDER—NO. 129.
OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT, METROPOLITAN POLICE,
NEW YORK, May 22, 1862.
Captain ____, Precinct—:—In accordance with the recommendation of the Committee of Arrangements for the funeral of Lieutenant Frederick Pross (who resigned his membership in the force to volunteer in the military service of the country), of Company F, thirty-first regiment New York State Volunteers, who was killed at the head of his company at the battle of West Point, you will parade on Sunday, 25th inst., with two sergeants and twenty-five patrolmen—captain and sergeants in full uniform, with belts and batons, patrolmen full uniform, except batons.
Drill Instructor Captain Turnbull is assigned to the command of the force upon this occasion, to be assisted by such aids as he may designate.
The line will be formed in numerical order in Washington square, south side, right resting on University place, at twelve o'clock M. precisely. Captains will report to Captain Turnbull immediately upon the arrival of their commands in Washington square.
The force of the Seventeenth Precinct will be detailed as the guard of honor. The flags at the station houses will be displayed at half mast during the day.
John A. Kennedy, Superintendent.
DAN CARPENTER, Inspector.

The line will be formed on First avenue, right resting on Sixth street. Societies intending to join in the obsequies are requested to report to Captain Turnbull on the ground. The line of march will be through Eighth street to Broadway, down Broadway to South ferry. The police force will cross over to Brooklyn and continue the line of march up Atlantic street, to Court street, down Court street to Hamilton avenue ferry, along Hamilton avenue to the bridge.

From the records of the 31st New York at the New York Military Museum and Veterans Research Center.


According to the pension information filed by his wife Elizabeth Louisa, the 41 year old Pross was from Gochsheim in the Grand Duchy of Baden in Germany. Before the war he had been a barber in the Little Germany area of the Lower East Side of Manhattan. (You will notice, of the fatality list of the 31st New York I posted, that all but four of the eighteen had German surnames.)
Friederick Pross left behind five sons between the ages of 16 and 4.

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Happy Anniversary to the First Couple . . .


On this two hundred and fifty-sixth anniversary of the event, we present this painting by Junius Brutus Stearns. The original, in the possession of the Library of Congress, portrays the January 6, 1759 wedding of George Washington and Martha Custis née Dandridge. The actual title is Life of George Washington- the Citizen from a  5 painting series on the life of Washington, the most famous of which is The Statesmanship of Washington (which I believe is on display at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts). The actual image above is of the lithograph by Claude Régnier.

Monday, January 5, 2015

More New York at Eltham 1862

 As part of my continuing series on New York state units at the battle of Eltham, here are the casualties of the 31st New York Infantry Regiment.


CASE, PHILIP.—Age, 23 years. Enlisted, August 13, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. E, August 11, 1861; promoted corporal, September 1, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va .
DINKEL , JOHN.—Age, 21 years. Enlisted, May 4, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. E, May 27, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va .
ELPET, JOHN.—Age, 31 years. Enlisted, June 17, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. K , same date; transferred to Co. E, November 27, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va,
GATES, VALENTINE. — Age , 34 years. Enlisted, May 24, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. K , June 13, 1861; promoted corporal, July or August, 1861; transferred to Co. E , November 27,1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va. ; also borne as Valentine Goetz.
DIES, FRIEDERICH.—Age, 37 years. Enlisted, May 4, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. E, May 27, 1861; killed. May'7, 1862, at West Point, Va.; also borne as Frederick Gies.
HAHN , FERDINAND.—Age, 24 years. Enlisted, May 7,1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. E, May 27, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va.; also borne as Frederick Hahn.
HAUER, CHRISTIAN.—Age, 36 years. Enlisted, May 8, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. F , May 27, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va.
HEISS, AUGUST.—Age, 31 years. Enrolled, May 4, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as captain, Co. E, May 27, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va.; commissioned captain, July 4, 1861, with rank from May 7, 1861, original.

LEISNER, ANTON.—Age, 21 years. Enlisted, May 1, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. E, May 27, 1861; killed in action, May 7, 1862, at West
Point, Va.

LINNSNER, WILLIAM.—Age, 28 years. Enlisted, May 8, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered to as private, Co. F, May 27,1861; killed, May 7,1862, at West Point, Va.

McDOUGAL, JAMES.—Age, 23 years. Enlisted, December 4, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. H, same date; killed, May 7,1862, at West Point, Va.

MILLER, JACOB.—Age, 19 years. Enlisted, June 19, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. K, same date; transferred to Co. E, November 27, 1861; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va.; also borne as Jacob Muller.

MINDERMANN, HENRY.—Age, 21 years. Enlisted, July 19, 1801, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. F, same date; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point,
Va.; also borne as Henry Menderman.

MULLER, CHARLES.—Age, 40 years. Enlisted, May 7, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as sergeant, Co. E, May 27, 1861; reduced, November 22, 1861; again promoted sergeant, February 1, 1862; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va.; also borne as Charles Miller.

MURPHY, JAMES A.—Age, 31 years. Enlisted, February 21, 1861, at New York city, to serve three years; mustered in as private, Co. H, same date; killed, May 7,1862, at West Point, Va.; also borne as James Murphy.

PROSS, FRIEDERICK.—Age, 38 years. Enrolled, May 8, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as first lieutenant, Co. F, May 27, 1861; killed, May 7,1862, at West Point, Va.; commissioned first lieutenant, July 4, 1861, with rank from May 9, 1861, original; captain, but not mustered, April 5, 1862, with rank from March 20, 1862, vice Lamb, resigned.

SMITH, WILLIAM.—Age, 22 years. Enlisted, December 18, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. H , same date; wounded, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va; died by reason of such wounds, May, 1862, on board transport.

STELZ, PHILIPP.—Age, 39 years. Enlisted, June 1, 1861, at New York city, to serve two years; mustered in as private, Co. F, same date; killed, May 7, 1862, at West Point, Va.